Paper I

(EA-DC II- 501) The Historical Development of Chinese Civilisation

Course Description:

This course aims to familiarize students with the emergence and development of Chinese civilisation in the imperial period. It aims to elucidate key features of China’s civilisation – including its philosophy, government, culture, material development and social institutions – within a broadly chronological framework. The approach adopted stresses both the unique features of China’s civilisation as well as its interconnectedness with the outside world. The projects could have a comparative study with India.

1. Emergence of Chinese Civilisation (6 Hours)

John K. Fairbank, China: A New History (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1992), pp. 4-25, 33-40.

Project: On a map of China, draw its major rivers and mountain systems. Also identify at least two major archaeological sites, the ancient capital cities of Chang’an and Luoyang, and the Great Wall of China.

2. Confucianism and Other Classical Chinese Belief Systems (6 Hours)

W.T. de Bary et al., Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. 1 (New York, Columbia University Press, 1960), pp. 15-33, 48-51, 62-63.

Project: Identify the main Confucian, Daoist and Legalist masters, and the major literary work identified with these three schools. Write 2-3 sentences on each.

3. The Formation of the Unified Chinese Empire (6 Hours)

Valerie Hansen, The Open Empire: A History of China to 1600 (NY and London, W.W.Norton & Co, 2000), pp. 96-149.

Project: Make a timeline of the most important Chinese dynasties.

4. Buddhism in China (6 Hours)

Arthur Wright, Buddhism in Chinese History, (Stanford, Calif., Stanford University Press, 1959), pp.108-129.

Project: Identify the main centres of Buddhism in China, the main schools of Chinese Buddhism and the three most famous Chinese pilgrims who travelled to India. Plot the routes by which they travelled to and from India.

5. Transition from an Aristocratic to a “Gentry” Society (6 Hours)

John K. Fairbank, China: A New History (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1992), pp. 83-87, 93-107.

Project: Write a 2-page description of the civil service exam system and its role in imperial China.

6. The Mature Chinese Empire (6 Hours)

Frederick Wakeman, “High Ch’ing”, in James B. Crowley (ed.), Modern East Asia: Essays in Interpretation, (New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1970), pp 1-28.

Project: Make a map of the Chinese empire as it was by the middle of the nineteenth century. Which territories were added through the conquests of the emperors of the last (Qing) dynasty?

7. Social and Economic Change from the 11th to 18th Centuries (6 Hours)

John K. Fairbank, China: A New History (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1992), pp.88-92, and William T. Rowe, China’s Last Empire: The Great Qing (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 2009), pp.122-148.

Project: Make a chart showing some of the most important exports of China in this period and trading routes connecting China with the rest of the world.

8. China and the World before the Nineteenth Century (6 Hours)

Mark Mancall, “The Ch’ing Tribute System: An Interpretive Essay”, in John K. Fairbank (ed.), The Chinese World Order (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1968), pp. 63-89.

Project: What was the relationship between tribute and trade in the relations of the Chinese empire with other countries? Answer in about 600 words.

Additional Readings

  • J.K. Fairbank, “Maritime and Continental in China’s History”, in Cambridge History of China, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983), Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 1-27.
  •   Xinru Liu, The Silk Road in World History, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).
  •   Ichisada Miyazaki, China’s Examination Hell: The Civil Service Examinations in Imperial China, (New York, Weatherhill, 1976).
  •   F.W. Mote, Imperial China, 900-1800, (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1999).
  •   Paul Ropp (ed.). The Heritage of China, Berkeley & Los Angeles, (California: University of California Press, 1990).
  •   Jonathan D. Spence, Emperor of China: Self-Portrait of K’ang-His, (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1974).

Discipline Courses II

Paper II

(EA-DC II- 502) Pre-Modern Japan (1603-1868)

Course Description:

The course provides a broad outline of pre-modern Japan. It covers economic and social organizations as well as growth of commerce and urbanization in Japan before the advent of the western notion of modernity in the country. The paper would also like to bring in condition of peasantry during the process of transformation. Intellectual turmoil and discourse of the time and its implication for domestic and foreign policy of Japan would be taught to enhance the comprehension of the era in students. Finally, the paper would also touch upon the advent of modernity in Japan. The projects could have a comparative study with India.

1. Political Organization (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 32-62
Project: The impact of the Sankin Kotai system

2. Economic organization (6 Hours)

Sydney Crawcour, “The Premodern Economy” in Arthur E. Tiedemann, ed., An Introduction to Japanese Civilization, (Columbia: Columbia University Press, 1974), pp. 461-486

3. Social Organization (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 96-126.
Project: Trace changes in the status of samurai during the pre modern period.

4. Growth of Commerce and urbanization (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 127-158.
Project: List the five most urbanized cities in the world in the eighteenth century and state the reasons for their high degree of urbanization.

5. Impact of Economic Changes and Peasant protests (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 223-256.
Project: Why did sericulture develop in pre modern Japan?

6. Japan’s Foreign Policy in the Pre-modern period (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 63-95.

7. Intellectual currents: Confucianism, Western learning and National Learning (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 187-222.

Project: Why was the spread of literacy so high in Japan compared to other countries during the pre modern period?

8. Internal Crisis, External Pressures and Downfall of Tokugawa dynasty (6 Hours)

John Whitney Hall, Donald H. Shively and William H. McCullough, eds., Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 5, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), pp. 308-366.

Additional Readings

  • George H. Tsukahira, Sankin Kotai System: Feudal Control in Tokugawa Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1966).
  • T.C. Smith, Agrarian Origins of Modern Japan, (Stanford: Stanford University Press,1959).
  • Chie Nakane and Shinzaburo Oishi, ed., Social and Economic antecedents of ModernJapan, (Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press, 1990).
  • Stephen Vlastos, Peasant Protests and Uprisings in the Tokugawa Period, (California: University of California Press, 1986).
  • Tetsuo Najita and Irwin Scheiner, ed., Japanese Thought in the Tokugawa Period,1600-1868: Methods and Metaphors, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978).
  • E. H. Norman, Japan’s Emergence as a Modern State (Toranto: UTB Distribution,2000).

Discipline Courses II

Paper III

(EA-DC II- 503) Colonialism and Modernity in Korea

Course Description:

The courese seeks to understand background and context of the colonisation of Korea by Japan. It begins with learning about pre-colonial Korean context and discourse of modernity along with the opening of Korea to the outside world. Whereas most of the scholars in Korea were debating about Chinese and Japanese responses toward the Western influences, there was another school in Korea which was looking to evolve idegenious response and articulation to modernity and captialism. The course would also try to create an understanding in students about the nature of colonialism in Korea by bringing in debate related to captialist development as well as gender relations. The projects could have a comparative study with India.

1. Decline of the Chosun Dynasty (6 Hours)

Bruce Cumings, Korea’s Place in the Sun: A Modern History, (New York and London: W.W. Norton and Company, 1997), Chapter 2, pp. 86-138.
Project: Chosun Society was divided in four classes. Describe all the four classes in brief.

2. Opening of ‘Hermit Kingdom’ and Sadaechui (6 Hours)

Andre Schmid, Korea Between Empires, 1895-1919, (New York: Columbia University Press, 2002), Chapter 2, pp. 55-100.
Project: With how many countries Korea signed Treaty of Friendship and Trade between 1876 and 1885.

3. Growing Japanese Influence and Korean Responses (6 Hours)

Andre Schmid, Korea Between Empires, 1895-1919, (New York: Columbia University Press, 2002), Chapter 3, pp. 101-138.

Project: Write a short essay on important two newspapers of Korea during the early-20th century.

4. Nationalism and Modernity Discourse (6 Hours)

Henry H. Em, “Minjok as a Modern and Democratic Construct: Sin Chaeho’s Historiography in Shin Gi-wook and Michael Robinson, eds., Colonial Modernity in Korea, (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1999), pp. 336-362.
Project: Compare nationalism in Korea with India during the colonial period.

5. Origin of Capitalist Modernity in Korea (6 Hours)

Dennis Mcnamara, “The Keisho and the Korean Business Elite,” Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 48, (May, 1989), pp. 310-323 or Shin Gi-wook, “Neither “Sprouts” nor “Offspring”: The Agrarian Roots of Korea Korean Capitalism,” in Chang Yun-shik and Steven Hugh Lee, eds., Transformations in Twentieth Century Korea, (New York: Routledge, 2006), pp. 33-62.

Project: Describe pre-colonial capitalist developments in Korea.

6. Nature of Japanese Colonial Domination (6 Hours)

Carter J. Eckart et. al., Korea Old and New: A History, (Seoul: Ilchokak Publishers for the Korea Institute, Harvard University, 1990), Chapter 15, 16, and 17, pp. 254-326.
Project: Japanese colonialism was most intense in Korea. What could be reasons for it?

7. Cultural Hegemony and Colonial Discourse (6 Hours)

Michael Robinson,” Broadcasting, Cultural Hegemony, and Colonial Modernity in Korea, 1924-1945,” in Shin Gi-wook and Michael Robinson, eds., Colonial Modernity in Korea, (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press), 1999, pp. 52-69.
Project: Write a short essay on the debate in Korea during the colonial period about ‘civilization’ and ‘race’.

8. Gender and Modernity in Korea (6 Hours)

Kim Young-sun, “Gendered Korean Colonial Modernity: “Housewifeization” of Korean Colonial Women and the Reconfiguration of Domestic Work”, The Review of Korean Studies, Vol. 12, No. 4, (December 2009), pp. 205-233.
Project: Make of list of ten important personalities in Colonial Korea and was there any female in them.

Additional Readings

  •  Michael E. Robinson, Korea’s Twentieth-Century Odyssey, ( Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2007).
  • Bruce Cumings, Korea’s Place in the Sun, (NY and London: W.W. Norton, 1997).
  • Chae-Jin Lee and Young Ick Lew, eds., Korea and the Korean War, (Seoul: YonseiUniversity Press, 2002).
  • Korean National Commission for UNESCO, ed. Korean History: Discovery of Its Characteristics and Developments, (Elizabeth, NJ and Seoul: Hollym, 2004).
  • Choe Yongho, Peter H. Lee, and Wm. Theodore de Bary, eds. Sources of KoreanTradition, volume II, (New York: Columbia University Press, 2000).
  • Haggard, Kang, & Moon, Japanese Colonialism and Korean Development: A Critique,World Development, Vol. 25, No. 6, (1997), pp. 867-881.

Discipline Courses II

Paper IV

(EA-DC II- 504) China’s Rise and East Asia

Course Description:

Since the end of the Second World War China’s rise has been the most significant event in world history In East Asia alone China’s rise in the last years of the twentieth century has changed economic, political and strategic relationships and raised concerns over the future of the region in the new century. These debates and concerns have ranged across a variety of issues but have concentrated on China’s foreign policy behavior, the definition of its core interests in the region as well as its position as the driver of East Asian growth. However, the recent rise of China and its influence in the region is only one historical phase whose echoes can be found in earlier periods of China’s long history. This course will attempt, therefore, to place China’s rise in historical perspective while looking at the meaning of its rise in the 21st century in the East Asian Region. The projects could have a comparative study with India.

1. Background and Legacy of China’s Rise (6 Hours)

John K. Fairbank, “China’s Foreign Policy in Historical Perspective,” in Foreign Affairs, Vol. 47, No. 3 (Apr., 1969), pp. 449-463.David Shambaugh, “Return to the Middle Kingdom? China and Asia in the Early Twenty- first Century,” in David Shambaugh, ed. Power Shift: China and Asia’s New Dynamics, (California: University of California Press, 2005), pp.23-47.

2. China’s Rise and the New Dynamics of East Asia International Relations (6 Hours)

David Kang, “Hierarchy and Stability in Asian International Relations,” in G. John Ikenberry and Michael Mastunduno, eds., International Relations Theory and the Asia Pacific, (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003), pp. 163-189. Wang Jisi, “China’s Changing Role in Asia,” in Kokubun Ryosei and Wang Jisi, eds., The Rising of China and a Changing East Asia Order, (Tokyo: Japan Center for International Exchange, 2004), pp.3-23.

Project: Make a chart comparing the eighteenth and twentieth century global strategic and economic powers.

3. China’s economic rise: opportunity or challenge for East Asia? (4 Hours)

Men Honghua, “ A sustainable Chinese Economy?” in Kokubun Ryosei and Wang Jisi, eds., The Rising of China and a Changing East Asia Order, (Tokyo: Japan Center for International Exchange, 2004), pp. 103-118.

4. China’s rise and security in the Asian century (6 Hours)

Jack S. Levy, “ Power Transition Theory and the Rise of China, “ in Robert S. Ross and Zhu Feng, eds., China’s Ascent: Power, Security and the Future of International Politics, (Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press, 2008), pp. 11-33. Chien Peng Chung, “The Spratlys and Other South China Sea Island Disputes” Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 1999).

Project: Make a map of the South China Seas and the East China Seas with the contesting territorial claims of different East Asian states.

5. Japan and the Rise of China (4 Hours)

Akio Takahara, “A Japanese Perspective on China’s Rise and the East Asian Order,” in Robert S. Ross and Zhu Feng, eds., China’s Ascent: Power, Security and the Future of International Politics, (Ithaca NY: Cornell University Press, 2008), pp. 218-237.

6. China and Northeast Asia (6 Hours)

Jae Ho Chung, “China’s ‘Soft’ Clash with South Korea: The History War and Beyond,” Asian Survey, Vol. 49, No. 3 (May – Jun., 2009), pp. 468-483. Kim Sung Chull, “North Korea’s Relations with China: From Alignment to Active Independence” in Lam Peng Er, Colin Dürkop, eds. , East Asia’s Relations with a Rising China (Japan: Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, 2008), pp.101-145.

7. China and Taiwan Issue: conflict and integration (4 Hours)

Richard Bush, “Taiwan Faces China, Attraction and Repulsion,” in David Shambaugh, ed., Power Shift: China and Asia’s New Dynamics, (California: University of California Press, 2005), pp. 170-187.

8. The Cultural impact of China’s rise (4 Hours)

Wang Gungwu, “The Cultural Implications of the rise of China,” in Kokubun Ryosei and Wang Jisi, eds., The Rising of China and a Changing East Asia Order, (Tokyo: Japan Center for International Exchange, 2004), pp. 77-90.
Project: Chart the Sinic world in Asia.

9. China’s rise and regional integration (6 Hours)

Jusuf Wanandi, “China and Asia Pacific Regionalism,” in Kokubun Ryosei and Wang Jisi, eds., The Rising of China and a Changing East Asia Order, (Tokyo: Japan Center for International Exchange, 2004), pp. 46-76. Zhang Yunling and Tang Shiping, “China’s Regional Strategy,” in David Shambaugh, ed., Power Shift: China and Asia’s New Dynamics, (California: University of California Press, 2005), pp. 48-70.

10. The Future of East Asia: New paradigms (6 Hours)

David Kang, “Getting Asia Wrong: the need for New Analytical Framework,” International Security, Vol. 27, No. 4, (Spring 2003), pp. 57-85.
Project: Build three future scenarios based on the economic and political rise of China in the 21st c entury.

Additional Readings

  •  Brantly Womack, ed. China’s rise in Historical perspective, (New York: Rowman and Little, 2010).
  • Rex Li, A Rising China and Security in East Asia: Identity Construction andSecurity Discourse, (Abingdon: Routledge, 2009).
  • William A. Callahan, China the Pessoptimist Nation, (Oxford: Oxford UniversityPress, 2010).
  • Alastair Iain Johnston and Robert S. Ross, eds, Engaging China: The Management of an Emerging Power, (London: Routledge, 1999).
  • Ming Wan, Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation,(Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2006).
  • David C. Kang, China Rising: Peace, Power, and Order in East Asia, (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007).

Discipline Courses II

Paper V

(EA-DC II- 505) Modern Japan (1868-1973)

Course Discription:

The course would begin with the study of process and characterstics of Meiji Restoration, which is considered to be the dividing line between pre-modern and modern Japan. Implications of Meiji reform in various spheres of Japan such as political organisation, economic change and social transformation. The enquiry about the intellectual current behind the modernisation project would also be discussed along with its implication for a powerful Japan which ventured into the project of imperialism in Asia. The course would try to inculcate in students an indepth understanding about the emergence of Japan as economic superpower in the region based on the changes which were brought out by the modernity and reform of this era. The projects could have a comparative study with India.

1. Meiji Restoration; Nature and Characteristics (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 333-370.

Project: What were the carryovers from the Tokugawa period that enabled Japan to modernize rapidly?

2. Political Reorganization (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 371- 413.

3. Economic Changes (6 Hours)

Peter Duus, ed., Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 6, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp.385-435

4. Social Transformation (6 Hours)

Peter Duus, ed., Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 6, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), Chapter 12.

5. Japanese imperialism (6 Hours)

Peter Duus, ed., Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 6, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 271-314.
Project: Do you agree with the dissenting note of Justice Pal?

6. Intellectual currents (6 Hours)

Peter Duus, ed., Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 6, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 654-710.

7. Occupation Reforms and Contemporary Japan (6 Hours)

Marius B. Jansen, Making of Modern Japan, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), pp. 675- 714.
Project: Gender equality in modern Japan.

8. Rise of Japan as an Economic Superpower (6 Hours)

Peter Duus, ed., Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 6, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 494-540.

Project: Why should one look at Japan’s economic development in a long term perspective from the Meiji Restoration onwards and not confine to the period after World War II?

Additional Readings

  • Nagai Michio and Miguel Urrutia, ed., Meiji Ishin: Restoration or Revolution, (Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 1985).
  • Thomas C Smith, Political Change and Industrial Development in Japan: GovernmentEnterprise, 1868-1880, (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1955).
  • Donald Shively, ed., Tradition and Modernization in Japanese Culture, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1971).
  • Robert Scalapino, The Foreign Policy of Modern Japan, (California: University ofCalifornia Press, 1977).
  • Michael Schaller, American Occupation of Japan: The Origins of cold War in Asia, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985).
  • Takafusa Nakamura, The Postwar Japanese Economy: Its Development and Structure, (Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press. 1995).

Discipline Courses II

Paper VI

(EA-DC II- 506) Korean Peninsula after the World War II

Course Discription:

The courese is an attempt to understand the division of Korean peninsula during the World War II. The division led to the emergence two different states which were based on different ideas of political and economic organisations. The contest and hostility between the two states of the peninsula resulted in the Korean War immediately after their birth and the rivalry has been continuing till now. The course would seek to teach two different trajectories of development models adopted by North and South Koreas. North Korean socialist experience got trasformed according to Juche idea, which was interpreted in an interesting manner. Similary, South Korean experiment with capitalist democracy deteriorated to authoritarian rule and then a long struggle for democratisation. The course would try to understand inter-Korean relations also by looking at the North Korean nuclear issue as an important repercussion of their rivalry and contest. The projects could have a comparative study with India.

1. Division of Korea (6 Hours)

Michael J. Seth, A History of Korea: From Antiquity to the Present, (Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2011), Chapter 11, pp. 305-338. Project: Make a map of Korean Peninsula and identify De-militarized Zone (DMZ) along the 38th parallel.

2. Formation of North and South Korea (6 Hours)

Bruce Cumings, The Origins of the Korean War, Vol. II, (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1990), pp. 185-236 and Charles K. Armstrong, “The Nature, Origins, and Development of the North Korean State” in Samuel S. Kim, ed., The North Korean System in the Post-Cold War Era (New York : Palgrave, 2001), pp. 39-63.
Project: Get the South and North Korean constitutions and identify three most important features of both of them.

3. Origins and Nature of the Korean War (6 Hours)

Bruce Cumings, Korea’s Place in the Sun: A Modern History, (New York and London: W.W. Norton and Company, 1997), Chapter 5, pp. 237-298.
Project: Make a poster of major phases in the Korean War with maps.

4. North Korea: Juche and the Consolidation of the Kim Il-sung (6 Hours)

Dae-Sook Suh, Kim Il-Sung: The North Korean Leader (New York: Columbia University Press, 1988), pp. 137-157.
Project: Find a picture of Juche Tower in North Korea and what is its significance?

5. Political Turmoil and Economic Development in South Korea (6 Hours)

Kim Hyung-a, “The Eve of the Military Coup” in Kim Hyung-a, Korea’s Development under Park Chung-hee: Rapid Industrialization (London: Routledge Curzon, 2004), pp. 39-65.

Project: Write an essay on South Korean leader Chang Myun.

6. Divergent Authoritarianisms in the 1970s (6 Hours)

Adrian Buzo, “Setbacks to Socialism, 1970-1980” in Adrian Buzo, The Guerilla Dynasty, (London: I.B. Tauris, 1999), pp. 80-104 and Hyung Baeg Im, “The Origins of the Yushin Regime: Machiavelli Unveiled” in Byung-kook Kim & Ezra F. Vogel, eds., The Park Chung- Hee Era: The Transformation of South Korea, (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2011), pp. 233-261.

Project: Write a brief biography of South Korean leader Kim Dae-jung.

7. Inter-Korean Realtions (6 Hours)

Charles K. Amrstrong, “Inter-Korean Relations in Historical Perspective,” International Journal of Korean Unification Studies, Vol. 14, No. 2, (2005), pp. 1-20.

Project: Make a chart of major milestones in the Inter-Korean relations.

8. North Korea’s Nuclear Programme (6 Hours)

Bruce Cumings, North Korea: Another Country, (New York and London: The New Press, 2004), Chapter 2, pp. 43-102.

Project: In North Korean map, identify probable locations of nuclear facilities.

Additional Readings

  •  Han Sung-joo, The Failure of Democracy in South Korea, (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974). Kihl Young-hwan, Politics and Policies of Divided Korea: Regimes in Contest, (Boulder: Westview Press, 1984).
  • Koo, Hagen, ed., State and Society in Contemporary Korea, (Ithaca: Cornell UniversityPress, 1993).
  • Michael J. Mazarr, North Korea and the Bomb: A Case Study in Non-proliferation,(London: Macmillan, 1995).
  • Don Oberdorfer, The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History, (London: Addison- Wesley, 1997).
  • Park Han S., North Korea: Ideology, Politics and Economy, (Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1996).
  • Soong Hoom Kil and Chung-in Moon, eds., Understanding Korean Politics: AnIntroduction, (New York: State University of New York Press, 2001).

It is expected that on completion of courses on East Asia of Discipline II, the students will have the following options to choose from:

1. Pursuing higher studies in China, Japan , Korea and Taiwan

2. Joining the Masters programme in East Asian Studies offered by the Department of East Asian Studies

3. Taking up internships in Think Tanks

4. On the basis of knowledge of the languages of East Asia, student could also work in private and public sectors.

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